baker.eduUndergraduate StudiesGraduate StudiesBaker Online

Build your design skills.

Become a qualified, licensed professional.

The feel and function of interior space is as important as the structure that supports and contains it. Interior designers use their creativity and sense of style and proportion to plan, design, and furnish interiors that are aesthetically pleasing, and achieve the intended purpose, such as increasing productivity, selling merchandise, or improving life style.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time undergraduate freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

An Introduction to Your Life at Baker College

The Academic Welcome Experience provides students with a smooth and helpful transition to college life. Students will become familiar with campus life, academic requirements, student expectations, learning environments, and the many services and resources available to them. It is also an important time for forming relationships and connections with fellow students, program advisors, and other members of the Baker College community.

Throughout the Academic Welcome Experience, students participate in a wide array of academic, intellectual, social, and professional experiences available at Baker College. Students connect with their advisors and participate in informational sessions aimed toward exploring career opportunities, networking with professionals in their fields, and sharing program information.

Getting Started

There’s a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

Request Information
Schedule a Visit
Apply Online

Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

I knew this was where I wanted to go to school.

Kelly Martin

Interior Design

Build your design skills.

Become a qualified, licensed professional.

The feel and function of interior space is as important as the structure that supports and contains it. Interior designers use their creativity and sense of style and proportion to plan, design, and furnish interiors that are aesthetically pleasing, and achieve the intended purpose, such as increasing productivity, selling merchandise, or improving life style.

Career Facts

$48,400

Median salary for Interior Designers

4%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$74,520

Median salary for Architects

View citations

Overview

Overview

As a student in Baker’s Interior Design bachelor degree program, you enhance your residential design skills with a concentration in commercial design.

Your program instructors are industry professionals, who help you refine your creative, technical, mechanical, and business skills through classroom work and real-world experience. You develop your individual style, creativity, and visual graphic presentation capabilities and, at the same time you build a professional portfolio that demonstrates practical, functional, and innovative ideas.

When you graduate, you’ll have completed a program designed in accordance with the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) Professional Standards, and be fully prepared to begin your career in a contract design studio or an architectural facility.

Course Information

Course Information

Interior Design Major123 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ACT 205

4 Quarter Hours

Explores wood frame structures as they relate to multi-family, low-rise, office, or small commercial structures. Drawing projects will focus on completion of a set of working drawings.

Prerequisite(s):
Architectural majors: ACT 103. Interior Design majors: IND 215.
Computer Aided Architectural Drawing II 4
IND 100

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces personal skills and resources needed to become a professional interior designer. Students utilize visual and creative skills to develop functional designs for interior spaces. Study focuses on: basic elements and principles of design, space planning, color theory, lighting, furniture arrangement, surface materials and portfolio building. Visual and oral presentation skills are introduced to prepare students professionally.

Introduction to Interior Design 4
IND 102

4 Quarter Hours

Offers a basic study of materials and components used in interior design. Focuses on selection, specification, and calculation of surface materials, drapery, and cabinetry.

Workroom Practices 4
IND 104

4 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth study of the business of interior design and the essentials for conducting a successful design practice.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 111A
IND 102
Interior Design Business Practices 4
IND 105C

4 Quarter Hours

Generates an understanding of the textile industry and of the products the textile industry produces. Students learn to analyze and identify natural and synthetic fibers, the methods of construction and finishing of fabric, and the properties of fabric for its intended end uses.

Textiles 4
IND 111A

4 Quarter Hours

Applies basic theory of proxemics and human behavior to the design of residential facilities. Study includes advanced spatial planning of furniture and floor plan arrangements. Projects incorporate kitchen elevations and layout design, and allows students to research and specify materials.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 100, IND 121.
Space Planning I 4
IND 112A

4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on more advanced space planning, requiring higher level skills. This course will include a capstone design project that will require code compliance and specifications.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 221
Space Planning II 4
IND 121

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces basic drafting skills necessary to create construction drawings. This course is essential for a basic understanding of proper use and application of drafting equipment. Students apply proper lettering, linework, and dimensioning techniques to produce floor plans, isometric drawings, and perspective drawings.

Interior Design Graphics 4
IND 131

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces concepts of basic AutoCAD to students providing them with a foundation to move to greater productivity with the software in subsequent CAD courses.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 111A
any of the INF courses.
Introduction to CAD 2
IND 151

4 Quarter Hours

Acquaints students with the basic principles of effective sales techniques critical to the interior design industry for both residential and commercial projects. Topics include application of the programming process, problem solving, critical thinking, teamwork, networking and presentation in the sales process as well as diverse approaches to selling concepts, services, and products.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 111A
Interior Design Sales 4
IND 201

4 Quarter Hours

Gives interior design students a clear understanding of the architecture and furniture styles from prehistoric to present days.

History of Furnishing 4
IND 202

4 Quarter Hours

Helps students develop an individual rendering style, to produce perspective drawings, and to visually illustrate ideas.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 111A
Rendering Techniques and Perspectives 4
IND 214

2 Quarter Hours

Expands student’s kitchen and bath design capability through the use of 20-20 design software.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 111A
20-20 CAD 2
IND 221

4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes residential design and blueprint reading. Students will obtain technical skills in residential building systems, codes, and construction. Students will also be exposed to methods of detailing and material usage.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 111A
Building Systems 4
IND 231

4 Quarter Hours

Applies design principles and presentation standards in the planning and designing of bathrooms. Following NKBA guidelines, students study proper application and construction techniques using electrical and plumbing fixtures. Cabinet selection and proper room layout applications will be covered. Projects include manual- and computer-generated drawings using 20-20 design software.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 214, IND 221
Studio Bath 4
IND 241

4 Quarter Hours

Applies design principles and presentation standards in the planning and designing of efficient kitchen layouts. Following NKBA guidelines, students obtain hands-on experience studying basic lighting, venting, plumbing, electrical, and construction techniques. Proper cabinet, appliance, and fixture selection and application will be covered. Projects include manual- and computer-generated drawings.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 214, IND 221
Studio Kitchen 4
IND 253A

4 Quarter Hours

Explores the various methods used in the design and presentation of portfolios. Students will be required to submit a portfolio.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 112A, IND 201, IND 241, ACT 103 or IND 215.
Corequisite(s):
IND 104, IND 231
Portfolio Projects 4
IND 301

4 Quarter Hours

Studies residential and commercial construction techniques and their applicable codes for accessibility, fire protection, and life safety.

Prerequisite(s):
ACT 102 or ACT 192A or IND 112A.
Building Codes and Construction 4
IND 321

4 Quarter Hours

Involves individual and team exploration with an emphasis on problem solving through varying types of rendering design typologies and sketching. This class helps students to develop individual rendering style, and reinforce skills in 3-dimensional drawing techniques. Students would further develop their creative thinking by exploration of a variety of approaches and concepts with originality and elaboration.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 112A, IND 202, IND 253A
Advanced Rendering Techniques and Perspectives 4
IND 331

4 Quarter Hours

Explores the presentation of design solutions in 3D form with emphasis on model making.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 112A, IND 253A
3-D Modeling 4
IND 341

4 Quarter Hours

Enhances the students’ ability to apply universal design  principles through the design of the built environment to enhance the function for all individuals, regardless of their abilities. Students will also gain understanding of the effects aging, injury and disabilities have on the home and work environments.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 112A
Corequisite(s):
IND 301
Universal Design 4
IND 351

4 Quarter Hours

Provides essential knowledge of sustainable building concepts that are fundamental to all LEED Rating Systems. Students will be exposed to the basics of the USGBC LEED building certification process and will apply LEED design concepts in a real project case. Students completing this course will be prepared to sit for the LEED Green Associate certification.

Prerequisite(s):
ACT 207
ACT 202 or IND 141.
Sustainable Design 4
IND 361

4 Quarter Hours

Concentrates on the specialized intricacies of the healthcare environment with a focus on identifying and implementing safe, maintainable products, finishes, and space planning in healthcare facilities in addition to research methodology, and the emotional and psychological impact of the environment on all stakeholders concerned.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 341
Healthcare Design 4
IND 401

4 Quarter Hours

Meets the interior designer’s need for education in lighting systems, equipment, terminology, and calculation methods.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 112A
Lighting Design 4
IND 421

4 Quarter Hours

Applies the study of historical art and architecture to appropriate design periods. Topics include strategies for identifying local community restoration and preservation efforts and current restoration planning techniques and procedures. Posed with a restoration problem-solving scenario, students will prepare a project restoration plan.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Historical Preservation 4
IND 431

4 Quarter Hours

Involves students in in-depth explorations of non-residential environments such as restaurants or bistros and retail such as boutiques. Students would concentrate on project management including problem identification, identification of client and user needs and information gathering research and analysis and space planning. Students will be required to render by any medium, manual or computer-generated, that successfully communicates the design intent. This course would also teach students to express ideas clearly in oral presentations and critiques.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 321, IND 112A, IND 401
Commercial Design I 4
IND 432

4 Quarter Hours

Involves students in an in-depth exploration of systems furniture in corporate and office environments including the relationship between human behavior and the built environment. Students would concentrate on problem identification, client and user needs, and information gathering research and analysis for the corporate and office environments. This course would teach students space planning with systems furniture including the use of adjacencies, circulation, and the articulation and shaping of space.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 431
Commercial Design II 4
IND 491

4 Quarter Hours

Concentrates on research, creating conceptual diagrams and sketches, and utilizing current trends in technology to generate entries for national and regional interior design competitions.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Senior Design Studio 4
IND 499

2 Quarter Hours

Concentrates on existing portfolios by adding work completed during the bachelor program and enhancing work already included at the associate level. Students must have their portfolio reviewed and approved by a panel of professionals from the industry.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Senior Design Portfolio 2
WRK 291B

1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate’s employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies 1
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ACT 103

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the use of the computer to draw plans for a single-family residence. A series of drawings will be required.

Prerequisite(s):
ACT 101 or ACT 192A or IND 221.
Computer Aided Architectural Drawing I 4
IND 215

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the use of the computer in the creation of drawings in place of traditional drafting methods. Students will create and edit drawings using computer software for interior design.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 131, IND 221
Interior Design CAD 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
WRK 265

4 Quarter Hours

Requires students to perform a minimum of 160 hours of paid/unpaid, work experience at a kitchen and bath design studio that is a member of the National Kitchen and Bath Association.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101
Program Director/Dean approval
Kitchen and Bath Design Work Experience 4
WRKTC 201

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a 120-hour minimum learning experience in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102 (Associate Degrees), 108 Credit Hours in CYBER DEFENSE MAJOR, 48 Credit Hours in GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS, minimum GPA 2.00.
Work Experience 4
General Education Requirements68 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ENG 101

4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I 4
ENG 102

4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II 4
ENG 311

4 Quarter Hours

Expands students’ writing skills beyond the expository style studied in Composition I and II and in the Workplace Communication course. This course studies poetry forms and fiction writing techniques. It is not necessary that a student be an experienced creative writer, only that he or she be committed to the writing process.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Creative Writing 4
HUM 101B

4 Quarter Hours

Enhances the student’s appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and the artists from each movement from the prehistoric period through the Renaissance are studied.

Art and Architecture I (Antiquity to Renaissance) 4
HUM 102B

4 Quarter Hours

Cultivates the student’s appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and artists from each movement from the Baroque period to the present are studied.

Art and Architecture II (Baroque to Modern) 4
HUM 401A

4 Quarter Hours

Identifies and analyzes ethical situations in modern society. Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Philosophy of Ethics 4
INF 113

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to beginning electronic spreadsheet terminology, concepts, and applications. Students will gain the ability to enter/edit, save/retrieve files, format, and print spreadsheets and reports. Students are also introduced to basic formula development.

Electronic Spreadsheets 2
INF 161

2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society 2
MTH 108

4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application 4
MTH 109

4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, right-triangle trigonometry, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, and regression. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 108.
College Mathematics II 4
PSY 101

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations 4
PSY 231

4 Quarter Hours

Explores selection, placement, and evaluation of personnel, work motivation, leadership, worker well-being, group organization, and processes in the workplace.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Organizational Psychology 4
SCI 451

4 Quarter Hours

Explores the relationship between man and the environment. Students examine the balance between natural resources including wildlife, their habitats, and the needs of man in the twenty-first century.

Environmental Science 4
SOC 201

4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology 4
SOC 321

4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity 4
SPK 201

4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication 4
SPK 401A

4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Professional Speaking 4
WRI 115

4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student’s individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Workplace Communication 4
Quarter Hours Required for Graduation 191
Program Description

Program Description

This program is designed to enhance residential design skills with a concentration in commercial design. Design projects prepare students to work in a contract design studio and/or architectural facility. Students select and specify appropriate materials and furnishings according to industry codes and standards, and apply knowledge to manual and computer generated drawings. Current building codes and guidelines will be applied to contractual documents in compliance with sustainable and universal design. Presentational skills are proficiently applied to advanced rendering illustrations and oral presentations.

Business courses enhance professionalism and provide a solid foundation for dealing with the corporate world. The program and courses were designed inaccordance with the CIDA (Council for Interior Design Accreditation) Professional Standards.

Accreditation

Accreditation

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

FAQ's

  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.
Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

My professors actually work in the field and have hands-on experience with photonics and lasers.

Dennis LaPort
Photonics Story